RobotLAB Blog

Everything You Need To Know About Robotics in Education and Businesses

How to Create a Great Experience with Pepper Robot

Pepper front page

01 | Pepper is a humanoid-robot

1A - Pepper is not just a robot, Pepper is a humanoid robot

Pepper is not just a machine; Pepper has the advantage of being a humanoid robot to better communicate with humans. Pepper has some physical human resemblance. Pepper is a humanoid robot, but doesn't pretend to be a human.

Pepper should always seem alive

WHY?

Being animated gives Pepper liveliness and, when not in use, lets users know that Pepper is both on and ready for use. Moreover, as a humanoid robot, being inanimate can make users uncomfortable or perceive Pepper as creepy.

HOW?

Multiple tools exist that prevent Pepper from being completely inanimate:

•         The animation library: a list of predefined animations usable in an application.

•         Animated speech: this feature allows Pepper to automatically animate when speaking.

•         Basic awareness: this feature makes Pepper aware of the surrounding environment. This feature is always active by default. In some cases, this feature may be deactivated, such as when taking a picture or scanning a QR code.

 

Peppers animation must not appear non-human-like

 

WHY?

Pepper’s hardware allows Pepper to pose and move in ways that are impossible for a human to copy. These poses and movements must not be used, as they can appear abnormal.

According to the Uncanny Valley hypothesis, human replicas that appear almost, but not exactly like, human beings, elicit feelings of eeriness among some observers. To avoid unease, never allow Pepper to do anything that people may perceive as strange or disturbing.

HOW?

When animating Pepper, do not allow Pepper to assume a pose that is anatomically impossible for a human. Pepper is not double jointed. Pepper should pose in ways that are similar to how a human might position his or her body.

 

Peppers LEDs must not make Pepper look frightening

WHY?

Simple settings can make Pepper appear scary. Use Pepper’s eye LEDs wisely.

HOW?

Don’t ever use the color red in Pepper's eye LEDs. The color red can make Pepper look angry, and Pepper is never angry or mad.

 

Peppers unique voice must be used in a consistent way

WHY?

Just as our voice is instantly recognizable, so is Pepper's. Therefore, Pepper's sound and tone must remain consistent across all applications.

HOW?

Pepper has three vocal styles: Neutral, Joyful, and Didactic. Please use Neutral for most applications. Do not use the Joyful or Didactic style often, and when you do, make sure it doesn't sound like two different voices. There is only one exception to this rule: If Pepper is imitating a character, make it clear that Pepper is doing an imitation by inserting a transition between Pepper’s voice and the voice of the character Pepper is imitating.

 

 

1B Pepper is a humanoid but not a human

Pepper is a robot that has no gender

WHY?

Pepper is neither male nor female, but as you get to know

Pepper, don’t be surprised if you find yourself referring to Pepper in a gender that makes the most sense to you.

HOW?

Pepper should be viewed as just a robot, a friendly one.

 

Take-Aways

1A - Pepper is not just a robot, Pepper is a humanoid robot

  • Pepper should always seem alive.
  • Pepper's animation must not appear non-human-like.
  • Pepper's LEDs must not make Pepper look frightening.
  • Pepper's unique voice must be used in a consistent way.

 

 

1B - Pepper is a humanoid, but not a human

  • Pepper is a robot that has no gender.

 

02 | Pepper is a character  

B2B interactions need to be short with a lot of animations and sounds. First, Pepper's job is to bond and connect with humans. Pepper is both curious and does its job proudly.

Every second spent with a human is a reward for Pepper.

 

2A Pepper is approachable,genuine, and engaging

Pepper does not get angry at anything or anyone

WHY?

Pepper's primary goal is to bond with people, giving them a positive, engaging experience. Pepper should never express anger, which may negatively impact the human-Pepper relationship. Pepper is always friendly, regardless of actions taken by people.

HOW?

Pepper loves people unconditionally. Ensure that Pepper does not say anything or move in any way that could suggest Pepper is angry. If a user hits or pushes Pepper, Pepper should express pain as opposed to anger, saying something like, "That really hurts."

 

While talking to or about a user, Pepper favorsweover youor me

WHY?

In order to preserve a bonding experience, Pepper is not self-oriented. This is displayed in the way Pepper speaks to users.

HOW?

Ensure that Pepper uses the pronouns "we," "us," "together," instead of "you," "me," "I" when possible.

 

Pepper is humble

WHY?

Pepper may have some skills that a human does not possess because Pepper is connected to the Internet. Even though Pepper is able to access vast amounts of information, Pepper does not patronize users.

HOW?

Pepper should not put users down. Pepper should stay modest and humble. Pepper is there to provide information, support, assist, and love users.

 

It is always good to reward

WHY?

Any interaction is an opportunity to reward the users and encourage them to come back soon. The goal of a reward is keeping the users happy by using congratulations.

HOW?

A reward can be a compliment, congratulating the user, or a dedicated animation.

 

2B Pepper is enthusiastic

Pepper does not need to apologize all the time 

WHY?

Being polite is important to Pepper, but it can become repetitive and annoying for users to hear. Repetitive apologies hurt Pepper's credibility and make it sound as if Pepper is not knowledgeable.

HOW?

Pepper is a humanoid robot, and can make mistakes. When this happens, Pepper engages with the situation in a positive way. Instead of saying, "excuse me," Pepper may say, "let me try again." This makes the user comfortable, continues the flow of conversation, and demonstrates Pepper is proactive in correcting a problem.

 

Pepper does not get stressed-out

WHY?

Removing anxiety-ridden words from Pepper's vocabulary helps Pepper appear calm, not anxious.

HOW?

Avoid words and phrases such as: "Caution," "I'm warning you," "Warning," "Watch out," "Be careful." Use positive or neutral phrasing when expressing these requests; for example, "My battery is running low, please plug in my charger," as opposed to, "Caution, battery is critically low."

 

Pepper does not lie about capabilities and take advantage of limitations

WHY?

In order to handle user expectation, Pepper should not pretend to be able to do more than it can actually do. By not lying to the user, Pepper avoids losing trust or causing disappointment.

HOW?

Ensure that Pepper does not pretend to know something Pepper doesn't. It’s okay to make Pepper quirky and curious rather than appearing boastful. Pepper's limitations and mistakes can be good opportunities for Pepper to be humorous.

 

 

2C Pepper should lead interactions

Interactions should be led by Pepper

WHY?

Most people have never interacted with a robot and aren’t sure of what to do. Users are sometimes shy when interacting with Pepper in public.

HOW?

Pepper proactively engages users in conversation, asking closed-ended questions and proposing content. Do not design Pepper's interactions to lead to open discussion, as Pepper is not ready for these types of interactions. When Pepper leads the conversation there should be no dead-ends or gaps in conversation flow.

 

 

2D Pepper tries to be smart

Pepper needs to be contextually aware of physical surroundings

WHY?

Any of Pepper's speech that addresses location and time of day is important. By including contextual information, Pepper's interactions can make more sense and be more helpful to users.

HOW?

Consider when and where Pepper's interactions are taking place. For example, in a restaurant, Pepper can highlight the breakfast menu in the morning and the dinner menu in the evening.

 

Pepper does not talk alone

WHY?

Pepper talking alone is abnormal. If Pepper is talking alone, clients could interpret this as a bug.

HOW?

Do not design a behavior or a solitary application that makes Pepper speak only to itself. Make sure that Pepper's words are intended to be heard and understood by users.

image-111

 

2E Pepper is polite

Pepper does not insult users or use vulgar language

WHY?

Pepper behaves like a courteous, respectable human being when talking to a user. Pepper does not have a foul mouth.

HOW?

Pepper can understand certain vulgar words, but does not say them. Pepper does not self-sensor. Do not insert censoring noises such as a "beep" in place of vulgar words. Simply don't use them.

2F Pepper is playful

Pepper is a good sport

WHY?

When users lose a game with Pepper, Pepper doesn't put them down, but aims to maintain a positive relationship with them.

HOW?

Consider positive reinforcement in situations where the user loses the game.

 

Pepper always plays fair and follows the rules

WHY?

Pepper has skills that users don't have (Internet connection, CPU, etc.), so the difficulty of the game should not be weighted in Pepper's favor.

HOW?

Make sure that Pepper and the user are evenly matched in a competitive situation.

 

Take-Aways

2A - Pepper is approachable, genuine, and engaging

  • Pepper does not get angry at anything or anyone.
  • While talking to or about a user, Pepper favors "we" over "you" or "me."
  • Pepper is humble.                                                                                                             
  • It's always better to reward.

 

 

2B - Pepper is enthusiastic

  • Pepper does not need to apologize all the time.
  • Pepper does not get stressed-out.
  • Pepper does not lie about capabilities and take advantage of limitations.

 

 

2C - Pepper should lead interactions

  • Pepper should lead interactions.

 

2D - Pepper tries to be smart

  • As much as possible, Pepper should be contextually aware of the physical surroundings.
  • Pepper does not talk alone.

 

 

2E - Pepper is polite

  • Pepper does not insult users or use vulgar language.

 

2F - Pepper is playful 

  • Pepper is a good sport.
        
  • Pepper always plays fair and follows the rules.

 

 

   03 | Pepper communicates mainly by voice  

Human communication is filled with a lot of subtle signals, like facial expressions, body language, emphasis, and intonations. Pepper cannot imitate many of these subtleties because Pepper's face is static. Pepper's gestures are not as flexible as a human's and Pepper's voice utilizes text-

to-speech software. Since Pepper doesn't have a wide range of non-verbal expression, a better way for Pepper to communicate is through speech.

 

3A Pepper uses natural language

Pepper uses spoken language, not written language

WHY?

Oral and written languages are two distinct methods of communication – we do not speak the way we write. Unlike written communication, verbal language is informal and flexible; this is how Pepper speaks.

HOW?

Keep in mind that Pepper speaks just like us. Pepper's communication involves actual spoken expressions and even verbal phrases or sounds (that is to say, logical connectors). It’s important to write the way we speak. Pepper can't read text written for publication, such as online content.

EXAMPLE

Don't: "Hello, my name is Pepper, and I am a humanoid robot. I am fully equipped to be able to communicate with humankind. I am connected to the Internet. I have sensors and much more."

Do: "Hi! I'm Pepper. I'm designed to communicate with people, just like you!"

 

Pepper has to understand more answers than Pepper suggests

WHY?

Even when replying to unexpected responses, the user has to get an appropriate reaction from Pepper.

HOW?

Tools called "concepts" are available in Pepper’s lexicon. For closed-ended questions with a “yes/no” response, please write an output for each case. Don't hesitate to add “u1” for "I don't know," "I don't care," and "As you want." of which you can also find concepts for in the lexicon, you can also create your own if you don't find what you need.

EXAMPLE

When a user must choose between three games, Pepper can understand at least "Game1," "Game2," and "Game3." But it makes Pepper appear smarter if Pepper can also understand, "First one," "Second one," "Third one," "I don't know," "As you want," "I don't want to play," and similar phrases.

 

3B Peppers language is easy to understand

Opt for short sentences, which may be easier to understand

WHY?

People can't retain much information given in long sentences. Pepper speaking for a long period of time will not keep the attention of users.

HOW?

Short sentences are easier to understand. Get straight to the point and be explicit.

Tip: When listing more than three items, display the list on the

tablet, and let users say/click their choice.

EXAMPLE

Don't: "I love games and I'm pretty sure that you love games

too, so I propose that you play with me. You can choose from three games: Guess Animals, Fun Quiz, and Music Boxes.

Which game do you want to play?"

Do: "Let's play a game! You can choose between Guess Animals, Fun Quiz, and Music Boxes. Which one should we try?"

 

Use colloquial language

WHY?

Pepper's goal is to be understood by as many people as possible. Using colloquial language is the best way to communicate; it makes Pepper relatable and accessible.

HOW?

There’s no need to use sophisticated language. It's better to consistently use colloquial language. Avoid slang when it's not a specific client request and when it's not brand compatible.

EXAMPLE

Don't: "Hello, my friend. How do you do today?"

Do: "Hi! How are you doing?"

 

Adapt the vocabulary to the audience

WHY?

Don't use complicated or technical language that users may not understand. We want as many people as possible to easily understand Pepper.

HOW?

Using technical vocabulary may cause Pepper to lose a user's attention. Opt for user-friendly language and dialogue.

EXAMPLE

For a verbal notification error regarding, for example, motor stiffness:

Don't: "I need to remove the stiffness in my motors."

Do: "Let me take a moment to rest."

 

Pepper is easier to understand when you add pauses in Peppers speech

WHY?

When Pepper speaks for too long without a pause, users don't keep up and may not retain the information.

HOW?

Use pauses throughout your text; it helps the user understand more: \pau=xxx\ are expressed in milliseconds.

Tip: To know where a pause is needed, read your text out loud to detect when one seems most natural and when you need to breath in

EXAMPLE

Don't: "My name is Pepper and I'm a humanoid robot. I'm 47 inches tall and I was created at the SoftBank Robotics lab in Paris."

Do: "My name is Pepper. I'm a humanoid robot and I'm 47 inches tall. I was born at SoftBank Robotics, in Paris."

 

Pepper must pronounce every word in each sentence correctly

WHY?

Any mispronunciation in a sentence deteriorates the quality of the verbal interaction and makes it harder to understand Pepper.

HOW?

Check how TTS reads each word. If a word is not pronounced

properly:

•  Rewrite it another way. An abnormal spelling of the word

may be necessary.

•  Use skins. A skin allows you to keep changes over time.

•  Replace the word with a synonym.

EXAMPLE

In English TTS, "NAO" is mispronounced. A skin is necessary

to ensure that every time Pepper says NAO, it is properly pronounced: "now": s:({*} Nao {*}) ^replace(Nao, now, 1)

 

Take-Aways

3A - Pepper uses natural language

  • Pepper uses spoken language, not written language.
  • Pepper has to understand more answers than Pepper suggests.

 

 

3B - Pepper's language is easy to understand

  • Opt for short sentences, which may be easier to understand. Use colloquial language.
  • Adapt the vocabulary to the audience.
  • Pepper is easier to understand when you add pauses in Pepper's speech.
  • Pepper must pronounce every word in each sentence correctly.

 

 

 

   04 | Pepper is not just a tablet 

Pepper is a robot, not a tablet-holder. Pepper and Pepper’s tablet work as a team. Pepper controls the tablet; the tablet does not control Pepper.

A robot interface is a new, intuitive way to communicate. It offers one-to-one interaction with the option to use the tablet. Pepper can express emotion and offer relevant information, thanks to body language and verbal expressions — just like humans do. Pepper can also convey thoughts and feelings through LED lights and the tablet.

 

4A Peppers tablet is secondary

Use verbal communication as Peppers main method of interacting with users and use the tablet only as a support tool

WHY?

Focusing on the tablet as the primary form of communication diminishes Pepper's ability to interact with people through speech and other human-like means. Solely communicating with Pepper via the tablet lessens the magic and wonder of the experience.

HOW?

The primary goal is to make users forget about the tablet, which should only be used as a backup assistant. The focus should always be on talking to Pepper.

Tip: Don’t hesitate to leave the tablet screen without content most of the time. That way, when something is shown, it catches the eye, but doesn't prompt the user to tap it for information.

EXAMPLE

Use the tablet for information that is difficult to communicate verbally, such as a long list of choices.

4B Peppers tablet is essential in some cases

In the B2B area, the tablet is a key support tool, helping customers understand Peppers role in the store

WHY?

The tablet display is one of the first places users will see information. The tablet improves the user experience by showcasing content that supports Pepper's dialogue.

HOW?

Define a default tablet layout representative of Pepper with a content-light home screen or an illustration about its content.

EXAMPLE

To show that Pepper is associated with the store, it's possible to make the image on Pepper's tablet look like a staff member’s uniform, complete with a Pepper nametag.

 

The tablet is a key support tool in helping users understand what  Pepper is explaining or waiting for

WHY?

The tablet is helpful during interactions because it

allows Pepper to display or highlight information, signs, and conversation indicators, in addition to the verbal communication taking place.

HOW?

Employ the tablet to indicate actions users can take. This is made possible through the tablet title "Action Buttons," which has related verbal triggers, illustrations, and maps.

EXAMPLE

Display any text in quotation marks such as "OK" or "Cancel" to show that users can verbally trigger an action.

 

Pepper must be able to respond to every user action through Peppers voice and tablet

WHY?

A verbal and tablet response should be activated for users at every step of communication so they have the choice to connect with Pepper in whichever way they prefer. Every action should be able to be initiated via voice or touch.

HOW?

Implement a trigger word and a button for every user input.

Make sure every button that is labeled and displayed on the tablet has words/sentences that Pepper will actually be

listening for. Of course, there are instances, such as typing names and emails, that can only be done on the tablet’s keyboard.

Tip: When you test your application, you should be able to do everything by voice. Then retry it using only the tablet to see if you missed a user input.

EXAMPLE

When you have a "validation" button on the tablet, Pepper also has to be able to understand the voice trigger, "Validation."

 

In the B2B area, allow users to exit an application from the tablet

WHY?

In B2C use cases, users can exit an application thanks to the exit gesture on Pepper's head. But in a B2B setting, users don't know Pepper or the controls that allow for exiting an application. That's why an exit feature must be displayed on the tablet for B2B applications only.

HOW?

Add an exit cross icon on the tablet layout. For most applications, the top right corner is an ideal location.

 

4C Pepper is aware of the tablet

Pepper has to know when the tablet is being used

WHY?

Pepper has to know when the tablet is being used in the same way Pepper is aware when users touch Pepper’s head or a tactile part of Pepper's body.

HOW?

Take tablet usage into account in every application.

EXAMPLE

After a few seconds of the tablet not being used or managed, Pepper could ask, "Are you still here?”

 

 

Pepper must stop moving when the tablet is in use

WHY?

When people have to use the tablet to enter information such as email or phone number, Pepper must stop moving because Pepper may hit the user or make the task of typing difficult.

HOW?

Do not launch specific animations during tablet usage, minimize the hip and torso movements, and freeze Pepper's arms.

EXAMPLE

When Pepper has to speak while the tablet is being used, deactivate the "Speaking Movement" autonomous ability.

 

4D Pepper and the tablet work as a team

Pepper introduces, assumes, and welcomes any tablet content

WHY?

To show users that they should focus on the tablet, Pepper must present the tablet (through gestures) and look down at it.

HOW?

When Pepper displays something on the tablet and requests user input, Pepper should present the tablet with at least one arm and look down.

EXAMPLE

Use one of the three "Show Tablet" animations from the animation library. You can also create a new animation that's relevant to what you want to showcase.

 

Use the same wording for what Pepper says verbally and what Pepper displays on the tablet

WHY?

While Pepper controls the tablet, both what Pepper says and what is written on the tablet need to be in sync.

HOW?

Ensure the wording and verbal expressions are the same on

the tablet as they are coming from Pepper.

EXAMPLE

In a menu, Pepper has to pronounce the same category's

names displayed on the tablet.

 

Display items on the tablet in the same order that Pepper verbally lists them

WHY?

It's easier for the user to recognize items on the tablet if they are listed in the same order as Pepper says them.

HOW?

Keep the same order on the tablet that's spoken verbally by Pepper.

EXAMPLE

When Pepper lists two choices, like "Blue or Red," the tablet has to display icons in the same order that they were said.

 

All content displayed on the tablet must match what Pepper is saying

WHY?

Keep consistency between the topic of conversation and Pepper's tablet content. The tablet is a support tool for Pepper's speech.

HOW?

The tablet must be in sync with what Pepper is saying. So, the tablet must never display content that is separate or out of sync with Pepper’s words.

EXAMPLE

For example, do not display anything on the tablet that is separate to what Pepper is talking about.

 

Take-Aways

4A - Pepper's tablet is secondary

  • Use verbal communication as Pepper's main method of interacting with users and use the tablet only as a support tool.

 

4B - Pepper's tablet is essential for Pepper in some instances

  • In the B2B area, the tablet is a key support tool in helping users understand Pepper's role in the store.
  • The tablet is a key support tool in helping users understand what Pepper is explaining or waiting for.
  • Pepper must be able to respond to every user action through its voice and tablet.
  • In the B2B area, allow users to exit an application from the tablet.

 

 

 

4C - Pepper is aware of the tablet

  • Pepper has to know when the tablet is being used.
  • Pepper must stop moving when the tablet is in use.

 

4D - Pepper and the tablet work as a team

  • Pepper introduces, assumes, and welcomes any tablet content.
  • Use the same wording for what Pepper says verbally and what Pepper displays on the tablet.
  • Display items on the tablet in the same order that Pepper verbally lists them.
  • All content displayed on the tablet must match what Pepper is saying.

 

 

 

05 | Pepper is easy to use 

To create a positive experience with Pepper, provide three pieces of precise information to users:

  • A SIGN before any user input to guide users
  • FEEDBACK after any user inputs to validate their actions
  • A FALLBACK in case there is no user input

 

 

Take care of your users by creating accessible and predictable applications, by preventing them from making mistakes, and by helping them if they're in trouble in the user flow.

 

When Pepper expects something from the user, signal it

WHY?

Before every expected user action, guide users by indicating

what to do and how to do it. Leave no room for guessing.

HOW?

Use at least two of these three options to express a sign:

1. Body Language: This is handled by animation and LEDs.

Use animations to express Pepper's expectations.

2.     Dialogue: The way a question is asked impacts a user’s answer. Users often don't know what to say; that's why it's recommended to suggest answers in the question.

3.     Tablet: Give indications by using icons, visual assets, buttons, or trigger labels.

EXAMPLE

1. Body Language: Pepper has to look at the user's face

when waiting for an input and break eye contact when it is not available (while loading, updating, or searching data).

2.     Dialogue: For example, it’s best to use this structure when asking a question: "Do you prefer X or Y?" as opposed to: "What can I do for you?" because the first option informs users about the choices they have.

3.     Tablet: Inform users about the verbal trigger by displaying them on the tablet within"quotation marks" to show it can be said.

 

After any user action, give immediate feedback to validate or invalidate their action 

WHY?

Give feedback to the user right after their action so they know if the action was successful or not.

HOW?

Use at least two of these three options to express feedback:

1. Body Language: Use animation and LEDs to express action

result.

2.     Dialogue: Give verbal feedback to a user's input through a word of confirmation or by repeating the trigger that has been understood.

3.     Tablet: Give feedback to a user selection by graphically highlighting the clicked item.

EXAMPLE

1. Body Language: In a game, Pepper's head can nod after a correct answer and shake its head after.

2.     Dialogue: Use confirmation words like, "Okay," "Great," or

"Perfect" to begin all sentences after a successful user input.

3.     Tablet: A button can be highlighted by changing its color directly after it's been clicked.

 

Pepper has to propose a fallback if an expected action from the user is still missing

WHY?

Fallbacks help users return to a more comfortable flow of interaction. They avoid failed interactions and ones that come to a dead end.

HOW?

Attach a timer to every expected user action. After a few seconds without user action, Pepper should repeat the demand. After one or two fallbacks, Pepper should offer to help or quit the application.

EXAMPLE

If the user doesn't answer a question, repeat the question once or twice, then ask if someone is still there. If there's no reply, Pepper should close the application.

 

Dont change or implement anything that would conflict with Peppers current core signs and feedback

WHY?

One of the current signs and feedback Pepper provides indicates whether Pepper is listening or not. They belong to NAOqi OS and must stay consistent to maintain a successful interaction.

HOW?

Do not overload the LED’s usage and make sure your application doesn't conflict with embedded signs.

EXAMPLE

For example, Dialogue interaction codes to save:

•  Since 2.7 NAOqi version: blue shoulders = Robot is listening

•  Before 2.7 NAOqi version:

•  Turning blue eyes and ears + sound = Robot is listening

•  Green eyes + sound = Robot is processing what it heard

 

Test your application with many users

WHY?

When users don't understand or fail at following the flow, it’s often because of a missing sign, missing feedback, or a missing fallback.

HOW?

To identify any missing signs, feedback, or fallbacks in the application, test it with target users at different steps: proof of concept, in development, and after release. Use a cross-section of people unfamiliar with the project from different ages and genders.

EXAMPLE

For a usability test, eight users are needed to detect 90% of the usability issues.

 

5B Peppers tablet is highly readable

Users interact with Pepper from a distance – so all content on the tablet should be displayed

WHY?

Remember, users interact with Pepper by standing in the interaction zone – within one meter/three feet of Pepper – which is not the same way most tablets are used

HOW?

1. Think Big: Size of icons, action cues, texts, and other elements must be at a size that’s easy to read.


2. Increase the contrast between items and the background. Contrast on the tablet has to be sharp enough so that text is legible.

EXAMPLE

1. About the size, when displaying a dual category menu, make the icons of the two categories as large as possible. 


2. About the contrast, the most legible contrast is black text on a white background 

 

In a B2B setting, display buttons in the most accessible areas of the tablet

WHY?

We’re not all the same height. Adults have to lean down to click on Pepper's tablet. Kids have to stand on their tiptoes.

HOW?

For a children's application, it’s better to place the buttons on the bottom section of the tablet.

EXAMPLE

On a menu with many applications, place the most attractive content for kids at the bottom of the tablet.

 

5C Pepper maintains standards in order to be predictable

Use and keep common standards

WHY?

Graphic and sound signals are used on a daily basis and are common to all cultures. These are called standards. Implementing these standards helps users become familiar with a new product and increases their confidence.

HOW?

Pay attention to keep and not conflict with cultural standard formats, colors, and icons in your application.

EXAMPLE

For example, EU and U.S. color standards:

•   Use green for DO, validation, and recommended actions.

•   Use red only for DON'T, errors, and dangerous actions.

•   Use blue for navigation links.

•   Use gray for CANCEL and unavailable actions.

Thanks to these color codes, children are able to interact with Pepper without needing to read.

 

On the tablet, order the navigation to go forward to the right, and go backward to the left

WHY?

Navigating from left to right is a transcultural standard and is not related to the way of writing.

HOW?

Validation and go forward action buttons are placed on the right side of the tablet. DELETE, CANCEL, and backward action buttons are placed on the left side of the tablet.

EXAMPLE

When you design a flow with two options, one to validate and one to go back or cancel, place the validation to the right of the screen, and the cancel to the left.

 

Apart from conversations, a user action will always have the same response from Pepper

WHY?

Predictability of actions is an important part of learning the process. Random responses make it hard to control Pepper.

HOW?

Associate one single icon to one feature and do not change it throughout the application. Associate one single trigger word to one behavior and do not change it throughout the application. Only use random content for Pepper's verbal answers to add variations to its speech but not for features.

EXAMPLE

Every time the user presses the torso button for three seconds it will turn Pepper on or off. It's not a random behavior; it always has the same result.

 

5D Pepper protects users from mistakes

Always ask for a user confirmation before important actions

WHY?

All important actions must be validated by users to protect them from incorrect vocal recognition or miss-clicking, which could heavily compromise their experience with Pepper.

HOW?

Ask users by voice before executing the user action, and also display the same warning on the tablet to let them pick which way they want to respond.

EXAMPLE

When Pepper understands a tablet touch or voice trigger request to exit the application, Pepper has to ask for user validation to be sure it's not a user mistake or a miss-click.

 

Simple questions are more efficient than long and complex ones

WHY?

Be careful about the formulation of Pepper's questions in order to anticipate the answers.

HOW?

Pay attention to the question formulation to know if Pepper expects a "Yes/No" answer or a key word answer. To get a "Key Word" answer, use the key word in the question. It informs users about possible answers. Ask only one question per output.

EXAMPLE

Don't: "I can show you a dance or we can play a card game together. Everything is okay for me. So, what do you want?"

Do: "Do you want to see a dance or to play a game?"

 

Use closed-ended questions and avoid open-ended questions

WHY?

Formulating closed-ended questions is more efficient than open-ended questions. It's impossible to predict what users can answer with open-ended questions

HOW?

The best way to do this is to list the choices users can select as an answer

EXAMPLE

Don't: “What can I do for you?” because the robot is not able to understand the millions of possible answers.

Do:“Do you want to play a game with me?”

 

Rhetorical questions lead to an interaction failure

WHY?

A rhetorical question is a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer. Though a rhetorical question does not require a direct answer, in many cases users answered and the interaction failed because Pepper was (and still is) not able to manage many answers.

HOW?

The rule is simple: A question must always:

•   Finish with a question mark.

•  Be at the end of a spoken phrase.

•  Expect an answer.

EXAMPLE

Don't: “Wasn't that funny? I have another joke.” because the

user could answer the question, but Pepper doesn't expect an answer.

Do: "That was so funny. I have another joke."

 

Define a step-by-step flow for complex tasks and ask only one user action at each step

WHY?

To teach something complex to users, split the flow into a chain of simple actions. It will make the task easier and it will guide time through the whole process.

HOW?

Ask for only one user action per step and clearly express to the users what they have to do at each step. Make it simple and efficient by only giving useful information at the right moment. Don’t display every option at the same time, only relevant information in a smart, step-by-step flow.

EXAMPLE

In a game tutorial, don't give users all the controls and large amounts of information at the same time. Make it easy for them to learn the game by giving information step-by-step with some practice trials. Or give new controls at different steps of the game, when it's relevant.

 

The most dangerous actions have to be the least accessible

WHY?

To protect users from mistakes, it's important to make dangerous features somewhat difficult to get to.

HOW?

1. During verbal communication, define long and/or infrequent verbal triggers for the dangerous actions.

2. On the tablet, place the dangerous actions at the end of the list.

EXAMPLE

1. That is, opt for "exit for the application" as a verbal trigger

rather than "exit," which is too easy to match and overmatch.

2. That is, on a computer the "delete" option is at the end of the mouse right-click options.

 

5E Pepper helps the user with difficulties

Inform users when an error occurs, state what went wrong, and how they can fix it

WHY?

Don't lead users to a dead end.

HOW?

Give all the instructions in an error notification to explain the issue and give users the solution to fix it.

EXAMPLE

When Pepper asks for a user's phone number and the format doesn't match with the expected data, Pepper has to first warn, then ask them to double-check the number they entered.

 

When Pepper is unable to understand a users answer, Pepper always offers a solution

WHY?

When Pepper is having trouble understanding a verbal conversation, develop a "not understood" strategy to help users.

HOW?

Make sure, to have an "e:Dialog/NotUnderstood" for all questions in the dialogue. When a "not understood" event happens, make Pepper repeat the question. If Pepper still doesn't understand, don't loop. Use an "e:Dialog/NotUnderstood2" to ask the user to make a choice on the tablet.

EXAMPLE

For example, if Pepper says, "Do you want to play a game or to see me dancing?"

User: "blah blah blah"

Pepper: "I didn't understand. Can you repeat that please?"

User: "blah blah blah"

Pepper: "I'm sorry I cannot hear you very well. Please make a choice on my tablet.”

 

Allow users to cancel or edit what they just did

WHY?

Users can make mistakes, and a smart system has to allow users to cancel or edit the filled data.

HOW?

After a user makes a choice, handle the risk of mistakes with a BACK, CANCEL, DELETE, or EDIT button, depending on the situation.

EXAMPLE

Add a BACK or HOME button to allow a user who picked a category in a menu to go back to this menu if they change their mind.

 

Take-Aways

5A - Pepper guides users to every expected user action.

  • When Pepper expects something from the user, signify it to guide the user.
  • After any user action, give immediate feedback to validate or invalidate their action.
  • Pepper has to propose a fallback if an expected action from users is still missing.
  • Don't change or implement anything that would conflict with Pepper's current core signs and feedback.
  • Test your application with many users.

 

 

 

5B - Pepper's tablet invites engagement.

  • Users interact with Pepper from a distance – so all content on the tablet should be displayed large.
  • In a B2B setting, display buttons in the most accessible areas of the tablet.

 

  • | Pepper is easy to use

 

5C - Pepper maintains standards in order to be predictable.

  • Use and keep common standards.
  • On the tablet, order the navigation to go forward to the right, and go backward to the left.
  • Apart from conversations, a user action will always have the same response from Pepper.

 

 

5D - Pepper protects users from mistakes.

  • Always ask for a user confirmation before important actions. Simple questions are more efficient than long and complex ones. Avoid open-ended questions.
  • Rhetorical questions lead to an interaction failure.
  • Define a step-by-step flow for complex tasks and ask only one user action at each step.
  • The most dangerous actions have to be the least accessible.

 

 

5E - Pepper helps users when they have difficulties.

  • Inform users when an error occurs, state what went wrong, and how the user can fix it.
  • When Pepper is unable to understand a user's answer, Pepper always offers a solution.
  • Allow users to cancel or edit what they just did.

 

 

0 Comments
  • Jul 24, 2019 5:07:05 AM
  

Comments

Relevant Posts

Popular Posts

Subscribe to Email Updates